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The Reality Dysfunction (Night's Dawn Trilogy #01) [ THE REALITY DYSFUNCTION (NIGHT'S DAWN TRILOGY #01) BY Hamilton, Peter F ( Author ) Oct-08-2008[ THE REALITY DYSFUNCTION (NIGHT'S DAWN TRILOGY #01) [ THE REALITY DYSFUNCTION (NIGHT'S DAWN TRILOGY #01) BY
Peter F. Hamilton
Dying of the Light (Mass Market)
George R.R. Martin
Leading 88
Following 34
Starship Troopers - Robert A. Heinlein When I watched Starship Troopers for the first time, I could not get over Denise Richard's nose...or Casper van Dien's rather lousy acting abilities. The only thing that actually made the movie awesome was NPH, just back then he was "that Dougie Howser dude" to me, but all in all the reason I kept watching the movie a couple of times. I'm a fangirl...what can I say, I fangirl hard! Anyway, when I first got to read Starship Troopers I was rather surprised that movie and book have nearly nothing in common. Sure, the names are the same, the bugs and the war, but that's about it. And if you keep both separated from each other, not comparing them, there's a chance you might like both. It was the first Heinlein book I had read, and just re-reading it now I've come to appreciate some things I did not quite like during my first read, which was about 15 years ago. There is no action in this book but a lot of things to think about. Heinlein used his books to not only raise questions but also to give voice to his own thoughts and morals. Endless tirades about how spanking a child to raise it is the only way for it to become a good citizen? Anyone? Anyone? Anyone? Bueller? Bueller? ... It is just like him. This book is a philosophical take on war, being a soldier, and society. It makes you appreciate more the things soldiers go through, put up with, give up, gain. It shows you why they feel pride. At the same time it is a swipe at modern society. Some of Heinlein's views might be outdated, but seeing that this book was written in the 1950s, his prediction of what was the downfall of many modern cultures seems to become more and more accurate. He puts the responsibility of upbringing and educating a child solely on parents or a guardian; accuses people have shouted for rights while neglecting their duty; defines the role of citizens within their own society; all things that - if you look at today's problems with younger generations - are relevant today. This book is one of the must-reads for everyone who likes controversy; who likes to ask questions; who likes to think. It isn't boring. It is quite interesting. And it certainly gets your brain going.